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Electrostatic Cooling of Electronic Packages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083540D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Robbins, GJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A cooling effect approaching that of conventional forced-convection air may be obtained by electrostatic cooling of electronic packages.

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Electrostatic Cooling of Electronic Packages

A cooling effect approaching that of conventional forced-convection air may be obtained by electrostatic cooling of electronic packages.

The cooling effect is due to a high-electrical stress applied between metallic surfaces which causes molecules of air heated by the power dissipating electronic component to be dispelled from the heated surface and carried out into the resulting natural convection air flow. This results in the absence of a boundary layer of air molecules, which, traditionally, has the largest temperature drop in a natural convection cooling system.

This cooling technique may utilize an existing high voltage supply (-5 to - 10kv) contained in the same frame as the electronics to be cooled.

The illustration depicts how electrostatic cooling may be implemented on a card-on-board electronic package 1.

Cooling cards 2 are inserted between pairs of circuit cards 1. The circuit cards carrying components 3 and 6 are mounted in sockets 4 on board 5. The cooling cards 2 have a metallized pattern on both sides which forms the cathode for electrostatic cooling purposes. The card metallization is charged up to a potential of -5 to -10kv by a connection 7 from the high-voltage power supply 10.

The cooling card connectors 11 electrically isolate the cards 2 from the board 5 to prevent potential build-up, and the associated personnel hazard on the exposed side of the board.

The metallization pattern on both sides of...