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Synthesis of High Molecular Weight Polymers by Microwave Radiation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083599D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Microwave radiation is an effective means for heating materials that contain polar bonds. The transmitted energy can be absorbed by such bonds and converted into heat. For example, toluene is transparent to radiation, whereas a solvent such as isopropyl alcohol can be brought to the boiling point under the same conditions.

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Synthesis of High Molecular Weight Polymers by Microwave Radiation

Microwave radiation is an effective means for heating materials that contain polar bonds. The transmitted energy can be absorbed by such bonds and converted into heat. For example, toluene is transparent to radiation, whereas a solvent such as isopropyl alcohol can be brought to the boiling point under the same conditions.

The main interest is in developing free radicals in a short period of time, thus promoting the formation of relatively narrow molecular weight distributions in polymers. Polymerizations were carried out successfully by this method using a monomer, such as methyl methacrylate. It was uniquely found that the polymers were very high in molecular weight.

Free radicals are promoted by this radiation, particularly from t-butyl hydroperoxide. The method has proven to be an efficient method of transmitting heat to a reaction vessel, instead of depending upon heat transfer from an external heat source. This is suitable, especially where reaction vessels are large and rapid heating by an external source would be difficult.

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