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Direct Voltage Hot Electron Luminescence

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083638D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiStefano, TH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Typical light-emitting thin films operated by a direct voltage have low efficiency, lifetime problems, and high-operating voltages. These difficulties are surmounted by the discovery which is discussed here.

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Direct Voltage Hot Electron Luminescence

Typical light-emitting thin films operated by a direct voltage have low efficiency, lifetime problems, and high-operating voltages. These difficulties are surmounted by the discovery which is discussed here.

Theoretical investigation of dielectric breakdown is applied for a direct voltage luminescence device. Light output results from the recombination of holes and electrons. However, materials which are efficient for luminescence cannot be made "p-type". A way of injecting holes into "n-type" luminescent materials is necessary to make an efficient solid-state light emitter.

Heretofore, a GaN thin film was driven to avalanche breakdown and holes produced in the avalanche recombined with the electrons already in the material, to yield the emission of light. The efficiency of this prior device is low because the bulk of the electron flow does not produce holes by impact ionization.

Holes are produced in an n-type luminescent thin film by the injection of electrons through a thin film of SiO(2), by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling induced by a high-electric field. Electrons can be heated for a sufficiently thin film of a wide bandgap insulator to several electron-volts of kinetic energy, without producing a dielectric breakdown of the insulator. Accordingly, hot electrons are injected into a thin film of n-type semiconducting material where they produce hole-electron pairs by auger scattering. Subsequent hole-electron recombination...