Browse Prior Art Database

Semiconductor Silicon Substrate for High Yield

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083666D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sharma, V: AUTHOR

Abstract

Present techniques of crystal growing semiconductor wafers result in silicon wafers with low and nonuniform distribution of oxygen, whose solubility is 60 parts per million.

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Semiconductor Silicon Substrate for High Yield

Present techniques of crystal growing semiconductor wafers result in silicon wafers with low and nonuniform distribution of oxygen, whose solubility is 60 parts per million.

It has now been found that low leakage in transistors and device shields can be significantly increased, if the semiconductor substrate during crystal growing is provided with an oxygen concentration greater than 20 parts per million and a carbon concentration of less than 4 parts per million. Such a substrate can now be produced by growing a crystal, using Czochralski or floating zone growth techniques, in which oxygen is bleed into the melt which is sustained in the crucible for a period of 4 to 8 hours before pulling, during which a carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide atmosphere is maintained.

The high oxygen and low-carbon concentrations thus obtained in the crystal improves the resistance of the crystal to slip and dislocation, during subsequent high-temperature diffusion processing of slices cut from the crystal, and also strengthens the material through solid solution hardening. This solution hardening causes generation of sites for gettering of undesirable impurities such as copper and zinc, which otherwise cause high-leakage defects in the produced material.

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