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Reworking Multilayer Ceramic Metal Layers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083717D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Interrante, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In products with electroless and electroplated metal surfaces, such as multilayer ceramic (MLC), it is sometimes necessary to strip plated layers, even after heat treatment, without damaging the base material. tripping usually causes some damage to the molybdenum base layer. This damage to the base material causes the MLC to not meet requirements.

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Reworking Multilayer Ceramic Metal Layers

In products with electroless and electroplated metal surfaces, such as multilayer ceramic (MLC), it is sometimes necessary to strip plated layers, even after heat treatment, without damaging the base material. tripping usually causes some damage to the molybdenum base layer. This damage to the base material causes the MLC to not meet requirements.

With MLC, the problem is unusual because the ceramic and the molybdenum conductors, which must be presented when removing any plated layers, are far removed from the normal materials on which plating is traditionally performed; therefore requiring special procedures.

A technique to strip plated layers is to use an iodine-iodide solution, which strips gold, nickel, and palladium films simultaneously, but leaves the refractory metal and the ceramic base in a reusable condition. The iodine oxidizes the nickel, gold, or palladium metal to their respective iodides. The alkali iodide complexes the heavy metal iodide and makes it water soluble. The iodine-iodide solution has little or no effect on the molybdenum etc., except that a surface oxide layer may be formed.

Any surface oxide layer and residual heavy metal compounds are removed mechanically by a vapor blast or a similar technique before reuse.

The modules are now ready for rework with a new layer of electroless nickel or palladium, and gold.

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