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Dual Nozzle Ink Jet Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083738D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fowler, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Various arrangements are described for ink jet printing, wherein a pair of nozzles are arranged to produce ink drops that are emitted in a controlled manner to collide or miss in various patterns, in order to print dots on paper or other material or not print, as desired.

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Dual Nozzle Ink Jet Printer

Various arrangements are described for ink jet printing, wherein a pair of nozzles are arranged to produce ink drops that are emitted in a controlled manner to collide or miss in various patterns, in order to print dots on paper or other material or not print, as desired.

In Fig. 1, two nozzles are aimed in an X pattern. If a dot is desired on the paper the nozzles emit drops that collide, coalesce and proceed to the paper. If a dot is not desired, the nozzles emit drops that miss each other and proceed to two troughs (buckets). Another arrangement is shown in Fig. 2. Many variations of the basic scheme are possible. These are discussed below.

A. One pair of constant-voltage vertical-deflection plates, two variable- voltage charging electrodes, one for each nozzle. Note that vertical deflection plates deflect the droplets vertically, but are themselves horizontal. Likewise, horizontal deflection plates deflect horizontally but are themselves vertical. Four possibilities exist.

1) When a dot is desired, each drop is charged the same for the proper deflection. Upon colliding, they coalesce and proceed to the paper. If the dot is not wanted, one drop is charged differently such that the two drops miss each other and proceed to the buckets.

2) This scheme is different from the rest in that the drops are always aimed to collide. If a dot is wanted, proceed as in (A1) above. If a dot is not wanted, both drops are charged equally but to a higher level, so that when they collide they bounce apart and proceed to the buckets. Several reasons exist for this possibility. One is that like charges repel. Another is that the surface area of one drop formed by two drops (of equal size) is 79.3% less than the area of the initial two drops. This means that the charge/unit area goes up and if high enough, the drop(s) could form into smaller drops. Hope...