Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Connection for LSI Electrical Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083757D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Uberbacher, EC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Integration of light emission and photodetection circuit structures within large-scale integrated (LSI) circuits (chips, modules, etc.) provides a basis for achieving high density of input/output connections. It permits replacement of discrete copper wiring with optical fibers.

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Optical Connection for LSI Electrical Circuits

Integration of light emission and photodetection circuit structures within large-scale integrated (LSI) circuits (chips, modules, etc.) provides a basis for achieving high density of input/output connections. It permits replacement of discrete copper wiring with optical fibers.

The advantages include: a) fibers are thinner than copper wires, therefore, less bulky; b) optical elements do not require physical or electrical contact, eliminating expensive metal contacts, etc.; and c) optical elements are insensitive to electromagnetic and electrostatic noise, hence do not require shielding.

Fig. 1 shows an array containing the three basic optical interconnection elements: 1) an LSI substrate 10 having integrated lightemitting and detection components arranged within a predefined input/output area 11; 2) a fiber-optic cable assembly 12 terminating in a connector housing 13, dimensioned to interface with the input/output area; and 3) a retaining assembly 14, utilized to secure adjustable alignment between discrete bundles of fibers in assembly 12 and light emission and detection elements in substrate area 11.

The cable assembly consists of 256 bundles, each containing sixty-three fibers. The bundles terminate in a comb-like structure 21 (Fig. 2) providing bundle collimation. Eight comb-like 1 X 32 modules of bundles are assembled into an 8 X 32 array of 256 bundles. The terminal entrance of the array assembly is ground and poli...