Browse Prior Art Database

Flat Type Heat Pipes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083857D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Connors, PM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A heat pipe is a self-contained thermal device that exhibits a heat conductance greatly in excess of that which could be obtained by a homogeneous piece of high-conductivity metal. Its operating principle is based on the evaporation of a liquid in the evaporator section, transport of the vapor to the condenser section, condensation of the vapor, and return of the condensate to the evaporator through a wick of suitable capillary structure.

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Flat Type Heat Pipes

A heat pipe is a self-contained thermal device that exhibits a heat conductance greatly in excess of that which could be obtained by a homogeneous piece of high-conductivity metal. Its operating principle is based on the evaporation of a liquid in the evaporator section, transport of the vapor to the condenser section, condensation of the vapor, and return of the condensate to the evaporator through a wick of suitable capillary structure.

Fluid circulation in a heat pipe is maintained by the capillary forces which develop in the wick structure at the liquid-vapor interface. The heat pipe principle is applicable over a wide range of sizes, shapes, temperatures and materials.

The heat pipe structuring in Fig. 1 represents a flat-type heat pipe with the condenser section 10 on the side opposite the evaporator 11. The vapor path is short compared to the condensate path. The arrows along the inside wall and within the wick, denote the path the liquid must follow from the condenser 10 to the evaporator section 11. The longest path is from the middle of the condenser section at point A, through points B and C to the middle part D of the evaporator
11.

In such a heat pipe there are concerns about the uneven distribution of liquid in the evaporator section 11 between points C and D, and areas around C getting richer fluid, and the possibility of evaporation of all the liquid before the D area is satisfied, resulting in a dry-out region and consequentl...