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Browse Prior Art Database

Nonrefractive Method of Determining Low Concentration Impurity Levels in Liquids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083866D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frieser, RG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Problems occur in determining low levels of contamination in liquids, and particularly in liquids utilized for coolant purposes, through conventional refractometer techniques. The term low-level contamination refers to contamination of less than 100 parts per million, and particularly in the range between 0 and 10 parts per million.

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Nonrefractive Method of Determining Low Concentration Impurity Levels in Liquids

Problems occur in determining low levels of contamination in liquids, and particularly in liquids utilized for coolant purposes, through conventional refractometer techniques. The term low-level contamination refers to contamination of less than 100 parts per million, and particularly in the range between 0 and 10 parts per million.

The primary objection to the use of refractometor measurement techniques in this area, is the excessive time and expense of utilizing such techniques in connection with a relatively large number of samples, as would be required to continually monitor coolant usage.

Described are improved techniques utilizing moire pattern indications in connection with the illustrated apparatus. This apparatus includes a collimated light source 12, a transparent liquid sample container 14 sandwiched between a commercially available line pattern 18 and, further includes a camera 20 or other means for recording the light patterns in the light path 22 extending through the sample container 14.

Utilizing the illustrated apparatus, one method of monitoring contamination consists of photographing the line pattern received through the sample container 14 containing a pure liquid, and then subsequently recording the line pattern 18 through a sample of the test or contaminated liquid. The transparencies of the photographs can be superimposed upon each other, so that the periodicit...