Browse Prior Art Database

Probe To Coupling Block Pressure Contact With Dust Seal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083869D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faure, LH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In existing buckling beam probe designs and hardware, the heads of the beams are forced against the space transformer conductors only when the probe tips are displaced against the product pads during testing. The intermittent contacts between the beam heads and the coupling block conductors permits dust and contamination to occur between the contacts.

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Probe To Coupling Block Pressure Contact With Dust Seal

In existing buckling beam probe designs and hardware, the heads of the beams are forced against the space transformer conductors only when the probe tips are displaced against the product pads during testing. The intermittent contacts between the beam heads and the coupling block conductors permits dust and contamination to occur between the contacts.

To alleviate the problems of dust while insuring a positive contact, a pressure contact with dust seal is provided. The pressure contact with dust seal, as illustrated in Fig. 1, comprises a resilient material 2 under the heads of buckling beam probes 3 in a probe assembly 4. When the probe assembly 4 is attached to a coupling block 5, the resilient material 2 is compressed thus forcing the beam heads against the coupling block conductors 6, as shown in Figure 2. This creates a positive pressure contact and seals the probe-to-coupling block connections 7 from contamination such as dust.

A variety of resilient materials 2 may be used. Some of these materials are silicone rubber, neoprene, and urethane. Various methods of applying this material under the probe heads may be employed, for example: (1) injecting the resilient material 2 around the probe heads in the uncured state then curing; (2) molding or punching the material in the form of donut shapes and assembling to each beam 3; and (3) inserting the beams 3 through holes in a thin layer of resilient materia...