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Back Sealing Electronic Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083902D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amaro, JM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In the manufacture of modules for integrated circuit semiconductor devices, it is frequently necessary to back seal the module. This is conventionally done by dispensing an organic resin to the back side of the module and curing. The coating must be adherent, both to the pins and to the ceramic, as well as providing a complete seal to the back side of the module.

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Back Sealing Electronic Modules

In the manufacture of modules for integrated circuit semiconductor devices, it is frequently necessary to back seal the module. This is conventionally done by dispensing an organic resin to the back side of the module and curing. The coating must be adherent, both to the pins and to the ceramic, as well as providing a complete seal to the back side of the module.

The usual system is to apply a polymer or liquid or gel form which is then cured in place. The dispensing system is quite complex and expensive both to build and maintain.

In this process, an epoxy coating is applied to the back side of a module utilizing prepunched sheets of epoxy material. As illustrated, the prepunched resin sheet 10, preferably a glass reinforced "B" stage epoxy, provided with holes 12, is dropped over the upstanding pins 14 on module 16. Holes 12 are punched to match the configuration of pins 14.

With the sheet 10 in place over the pins 14, it is pressed against the ceramic module 16 and cured, as for example, by heating at 150 degrees C for two and one-half hours. The specific cure depends on the specific coating material used in the preform.

The resultant epoxy polymer coating may be removed by using suitable chemical compounds, which allow replacement of damaged pins 14 and/or module repair.

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