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Queue With Link and Multiprogramming

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083939D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clark, JC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A buffer holds words that are used, for example, to test a data processing system. In a simple example of such a test, a word is fetched from the buffer and is used to control a single test operation. Similarly, a word may be fetched and used for a selected number of test operations, or a selected number of words may be accessed in sequence from a starting address in the buffer and each of these words used for one test operation. After an operation that begins at one point in the buffer, the test may proceed to an operation that begins at a different point in the buffer.

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Queue With Link and Multiprogramming

A buffer holds words that are used, for example, to test a data processing system. In a simple example of such a test, a word is fetched from the buffer and is used to control a single test operation. Similarly, a word may be fetched and used for a selected number of test operations, or a selected number of words may be accessed in sequence from a starting address in the buffer and each of these words used for one test operation. After an operation that begins at one point in the buffer, the test may proceed to an operation that begins at a different point in the buffer.

This system has a set of sixteen stacks of sixteen registers each that control the sequence of operations through the buffer. A stack word is sixteen-bits long and the format of a stack word is shown in the block at the output of the attack. One of the sixteen stacks is addressed by a line select stack, and an address on a line pointer selects a particular register in the selected stack.

At the end of an operation that is controlled by a stack word, bit position 12 of the word controls the stack addressing circuits to advance the pointer to the next word in the previously selected stack, or to select a few stack from a list of stacks, not shown.

Bit positions 0-7 of a stack word hold an address, and bit position 15 directs this address to the buffer. Bit position 14 signals the buffer for a read operation for the tests that have been described or for a write o...