Browse Prior Art Database

Soldering Nickel Chrome Wires

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000083944D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bernard, CD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Insulated nickel-chrome wires are wound in coils to form precision resistors for power transistor circuits. Because nickel-chrome wires can not be readily soldered, a variety of techniques have been proposed for making an electrical connection between the ends of the resistance wire and printed conductors on a circuit board: wires have been riveted to the conductors and the board, wires have been swaged to a copper element that has been soldered to the board; wires have been pretinned by using a stainless steel soldering flux; and wires have been welded to the circuit board connectors.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Soldering Nickel Chrome Wires

Insulated nickel-chrome wires are wound in coils to form precision resistors for power transistor circuits. Because nickel-chrome wires can not be readily soldered, a variety of techniques have been proposed for making an electrical connection between the ends of the resistance wire and printed conductors on a circuit board: wires have been riveted to the conductors and the board, wires have been swaged to a copper element that has been soldered to the board; wires have been pretinned by using a stainless steel soldering flux; and wires have been welded to the circuit board connectors.

It has been found that nickel-chrome wires can be conventionally soldered to circuit-board conductors after they are given a flash nickel coating that is 10-30 millionths of an inch thick. The solder joints of the nickel coated wires show good wettability under a scanning electron microscope.

Mechanical failure under test occurs at a higher and more uniform values than when other soldering techniques were used, and failure occurs by breaking loose the entire plated through-hole barrel, whereas failures with other soldering methods occur by pulling the wire free from the solder fillet.

1