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Browse Prior Art Database

Power Supply Controls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084031D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gilliland, JW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A communication or process control loop has a master programmed controller with a plurality of remote stations. The power consumption of the apparatus is reduced by selectively turning the remote stations on and off from the programmed controller.

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Power Supply Controls

A communication or process control loop has a master programmed controller with a plurality of remote stations. The power consumption of the apparatus is reduced by selectively turning the remote stations on and off from the programmed controller.

The loop consisting of one or more signal wires is connected to the remote stations, respectively, through loop ports A, B, C, and others, not shown, for establishing AC communication, preferably of the pulse type, with the programmed controller. In each remote station, a data unit is attached to each loop port. The data unit may be a cathode-ray tube (CRT) terminal, punch paper tape reader, punch card reader, magnetic storage disk unit, magnetic storage tape unit, other communication lines, etc.

In those situations wherein less than all of the remote stations are operative at a given time, it is desirable to power-down the units. To facilitate automatic power-on and power-down, the programmed controller supplies a DC bias over a signal wire (or a separate wire) simultaneously with supplying AC-type power command signals addressing the unit to be turned on or turned off. Power-off commands can be given without the DC bias. When power-down time is such that power-down cannot be fully assured, addition of a coincident DC bias can be advantageous.

Each remote station has a loop port circuit shown in diagrammatic form for station B. A DC supply source BB supplies power to the sense circuit. This circuit is of the semiconductive type and, hence, of low-power drain. The signal relay and decoder receives signals from the loop via loop port A and relays them to the downstream remote stations such as station C. The sense circuit is responsive to the DC bias via the low-pass filter.

Upon sensing a DC bias, a decoder is powered for receiving an address signal from the signal relay and decoder. Then, the received command as decoded by the decoder, is supplied to the data unit over cable PDA s...