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Fabrication of Amorphous Silicon Crystalline Silicon Heterojunctions by Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084138D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brodsky, MH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The rectifying junctions produced by this technique show high barriers on p-type substrates, low barriers on n-type substrates, and have no problems due to oxygen contamination in the junction region.

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Fabrication of Amorphous Silicon Crystalline Silicon Heterojunctions by Ion Implantation

The rectifying junctions produced by this technique show high barriers on p- type substrates, low barriers on n-type substrates, and have no problems due to oxygen contamination in the junction region.

Rectifying amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions have been fabricated using ion implantation techniques. Crystalline silicon substrates of both p-type and n-type, 0.1 ohm-cm, 1.0 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm were implanted with silicon ions to produce a thin amorphous layer. The important features of this technique are the emphasis on a thin layer which allows a sufficiently sharp junction to be formed, and the ion implantation which eliminates problems due to oxygen contamination (SiO(2)) in the junction region. A diagram of a typical junction is shown in Fig. 1.

Amorphous silicon thicknesses which were obtained were 170 Angstroms and 550 Angstroms, The thicknesses of the damaged but nonamorphous layers are estimated to be 30 Angstroms and 100 Angstroms, respectively. It is the latter thickness whi determines the sharpness of the junction.

The most reproducible junctions were formed when an additional 4% of silicon atoms were implanted near the surface. Junctions were also formed with approximately 1% additional atoms, which seems to be the lower limit for producing amorphous layers that extend to the surface. Somewhat higher dosages are expected to yield more uniform...