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Triggerable Charge Transfer Reactions in a Solid Thin Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084139D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dacol, FH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Charge-transfer reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor (D) molecule to an acceptor (A) molecule has been observed heretofore in solvents. In solution, the D and A molecules are able to associate and interact forming D+A-. The charge transfer can often be triggered optically. Some of the problems associated with a solution are: the image can diffuse, the complex can precipitate out, and there can be significant back reaction.

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Triggerable Charge Transfer Reactions in a Solid Thin Film

Charge-transfer reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor
(D) molecule to an acceptor (A) molecule has been observed heretofore in solvents. In solution, the D and A molecules are able to associate and interact forming D+A-. The charge transfer can often be triggered optically. Some of the problems associated with a solution are: the image can diffuse, the complex can precipitate out, and there can be significant back reaction.

There is described herein a way of incorporating certain D and A molecules in a solid, thin film matrix (with no solvent present) and triggering of the charge- transfer reaction optically. It was found that: a) The reaction can be triggered with ultraviolet light; b) The reaction D+A-->(Hupsilon D+A- results in a permanent color change in the visible, so that the image can be viewed in ordinary light: c) The image does not diffuse; and d) There is no observable back reaction.

Common hydrophobic D and A molecules are added to the fatty acid Mn- stearate. It may be possible to use other fatty acids or phospholipids in a common solvent. A thin film multilayer matrix of the fatty acid is made using the Langmuir technique, I. Langmuir, Trans. Faraday Soc., 15 62 (1920).

It is assumed that the D and A molecules interact with the hydrocarbon part of the fatty acid, allowing the former to be incorporated in the planar layered matrix thereof. X-ray measurements indicate tha...