Browse Prior Art Database

UV Laser Write In or Image Transfer for Plasma Display Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084153D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zarowin, CB: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described which permits optical writing at high speeds for a standard glass plate (not quartz) AC plasma display panel. This is achieved by the use of 3371 A nitrogen laser radiation to perform the write operation. Although ultraviolet light sources have previously been used to write images on plasma display panels, the panel faceplates in those instances had to be fabricated from quartz, instead of sodalime silicate or "window" glass, as described here.

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UV Laser Write In or Image Transfer for Plasma Display Panel

A technique is described which permits optical writing at high speeds for a standard glass plate (not quartz) AC plasma display panel. This is achieved by the use of 3371 A nitrogen laser radiation to perform the write operation. Although ultraviolet light sources have previously been used to write images on plasma display panels, the panel faceplates in those instances had to be fabricated from quartz, instead of sodalime silicate or "window" glass, as described here.

Although the nitrogen laser emits at 3371 Angstroms, outside the wavelength range reported by Weber in "IEEE Transactions On Electron Devices", Volume 18, September 1971, it is shown here that optical write-in occurs through the usual glass panel structure with a MgO refractory layer on dielectric coated electrodes. Apparently, the high powered (>~ 10 Kw), short duration approximately 10 nanosecond pulses are able to pass through the glass sufficiently, so as to cause photoelectric emission at the MgO surface(s) and thereby write the panel cells.

In accordance with such a scheme, it is possible to utilize point-by-point, line- by-line or image transfer, or even hologram, writing into a conventional AC gas panel. The transmission of glass below 3300 Angstroms is quite low. Although the photoelectric efficiency increases with shorter wavelengths, the expensive (if not prohibitive) use of a quartz face plate has tended to discourage this app...