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Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Application to Reduce Process Setup Time

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084198D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schuman, KL: AUTHOR

Abstract

A computer-controlled axial leaded component sequencer, which is used as an integral part of an automatic insertion process, normally requires significant setup time per job to load the specified-components on the appropriate heads. The sequencer embraces a substantial number of inline component dispensing heads with associated component reel holders.

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Computer Application to Reduce Process Setup Time

A computer-controlled axial leaded component sequencer, which is used as an integral part of an automatic insertion process, normally requires significant setup time per job to load the specified-components on the appropriate heads. The sequencer embraces a substantial number of inline component dispensing heads with associated component reel holders.

The computer is initially programmed with specific setup data for each assembly. Inherent with this data is the relationship between the component, its dispensing head and the actuation of the head. The machine uses this data to produce a sequence of various components, that can be automatically inserted progressively on a printed-circuit card during one pass across an automatic computer-controlled insertion machine.

A computer program, in the same CPU that controls the process equipment, compares the initial component and head configuration of a job currently set up on the sequencer, with that of all of the jobs waiting to be sequenced. After comparison, the computer recognizes common components used within the jobs and generates new setups with matching machine control data, to allow the commonly used components to remain on the machine at their respective head locations from job-to-job. For this reason, setup time is appreciably reduced.

The prior method required complete tear down and a new setup for each job. Those components which may have been common to several jobs still to be sequenced were moved to another...