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Producing Long, Narrow Conductors on Ceramic or Glass Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084332D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoekstra, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method applies the ink mist jet printing techniques to direct deposition of conductive patterns on ceramic or glass substrates, used in the production of gas display panels. The method includes moving a nozzle along the substrate, with the nozzle directing an aerosol jet containing a mist of metal particles therein onto the substrate. The metal particles are entrained in the jet and focused on the substrate, so as to form conductive lines narrower than the orifice of the jet.

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Producing Long, Narrow Conductors on Ceramic or Glass Substrates

This method applies the ink mist jet printing techniques to direct deposition of conductive patterns on ceramic or glass substrates, used in the production of gas display panels. The method includes moving a nozzle along the substrate, with the nozzle directing an aerosol jet containing a mist of metal particles therein onto the substrate. The metal particles are entrained in the jet and focused on the substrate, so as to form conductive lines narrower than the orifice of the jet.

For narrow lines, i.e., one mil, the width of the line is generally dependent on the particle size of the ink mist and on the flow rate through the nozzle. By varying the frequency of the nebulizer, the desired particle size is obtained. Also, the optimum nozzle size can be selected for a given line width, flow rate and particle size. Potentially, a one mil line ten inches long of a printed Ag solution can have a resistance of approximately 100 ohms after firing.

Using an organic metal compound in solution, the material can be applied directly on the substrate. If desired, a photoresist can be applied by this technique, and conventional etching used to delineate the lines. When the organic metal compound is heated in an oxidizing atmosphere, it produces a conductor having the same width and length as printed.

Although there are other methods available to produce conductive lines, such as silk-screen printing and vapor depo...