Browse Prior Art Database

Processor Control of a Paper Tape Punch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084370D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The hardware attachment illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 provides program control for the IBM 1018 paper tape punch, using standard IBM System/7 digital input (DI) and digital output (DO) interfaces. The hardware attachment reduces program overhead and time dependency problems.

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Processor Control of a Paper Tape Punch

The hardware attachment illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 provides program control for the IBM 1018 paper tape punch, using standard IBM System/7 digital input (DI) and digital output (DO) interfaces. The hardware attachment reduces program overhead and time dependency problems.

As seen in Fig. 1, the attachment 1 receives control and data bits from the System/7 over a line 2 and gates these signals to the punch 3. The punch responds with timing and status signals to the adapter 1 over bus 4, and the adapter uses these signals to synchronize the data transfers and the incrementer signals. The completion of a punch sequence is signaled to the System/7 program as an indication to transfer the next digit. Since all synchronization is accomplished in the attachment device, the program can present a character at its most convenient time.

Figs. 2 and 3 respectively illustrate the attachment hardware and the punch sequence cycling. The attachment removes the tight timing requirements from the program and still permits attachment of the punch to standard DI and DO interfaces. The program presents the data at its leisure and then causes a punch cycle to be initiated by changing the feed hole bit illustrated in Fig. 3. The interface changes the ready signal to busy, synchronizes the data transfer to the punch, chooses the proper incrementer magnet, and resets the busy signal at the end of the cycle indicating to the System/7 that it is re...