Browse Prior Art Database

Directory Assistance Message Accounting System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084372D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 125K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, RL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A method is described for performing directory assistance message accounting (DAMA) and analysis using an IBM System/7 Computer and associated equipment. The system maximizes the use of the telephone company's existing directory assistance equipment with minimum modifications, as shown in Figs. 1-3.

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Directory Assistance Message Accounting System

A method is described for performing directory assistance message accounting (DAMA) and analysis using an IBM System/7 Computer and associated equipment. The system maximizes the use of the telephone company's existing directory assistance equipment with minimum modifications, as shown in Figs. 1-3.

A typical directory assistance may involve up to five types of incoming trunks:
(1) local, (2) tributary with or without automatic number identification (ANI), (3) extended area service (EAS) directory assistance, (4) long distance directory assistance (LD), and (5) Intercept (where the original number has been changed or discontinued).

The operator finds switch 7 comes in many varieties and may be a dedicated switching facility or operating in conjunction with other types of service. The directory assistance operator positions are usually dedicated positions, but may be combined with other operations during light traffic periods.

The backbone of the DAMA System is a System/7 computer 1, one to four digital input/digital output (DI/DO) multiplexers 2, 5028 operator station 3, DC-AC inverter 4, and a record output device 5. Each DI/DO multiplexer provides a plurality of input circuits for monitoring signal status and output circuits for control. The operator station 6 is a light-duty device intended primarily for entering system commands and printing of information on system status. It consists of a printer, keyboard, paper tape punch and paper tape reader. The record output media 5 may be a high-speed paper tape punch, a magnetic tape unit, or a disk storage module.

Fig. 1 illustrates the interface between the DI/DO multiplexer and the various types of trunks 6a, 6b. The trunks are divided essentially into two basic groups. The call "charge" trunks 6a (local and tributary directory assistance trunks) and the "monitor" trunks 6b (LD, EAS and Intercept) from which statistics but not billing data are accumulated.

Fig. 2 illustrates a system in an office having no local directory assistance trunks. Seizure of the incoming tributary directory assistance trunk 8 is detected when the trunk returns a ground on the C IN or S (sleeve) lead. Detection of the seizure by a DI circuit causes the System/7 to close a DO relay circuit to request identification of the calling party. Request ID lead, the operated T-bar switch contacts 9 to the CL1 relay winding 10.

Simultaneous with the closure of the "request ID" circuit, a DO circuit is closed to operate relay A1 on the same trunk to connect the multi-frequency receiver app...