Browse Prior Art Database

Queueing Technique for Bandwidth Allocation in a Packet Switched Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084431D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friedman, SW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In packet switched networks data messages are routed through multiple store and forward exchange nodes in multibit packet units. Typically, each nodal exchange determines the forward routing of packets by utilizing a stored route selection table to assign a storage queue to each packet on arrival. Such queues are emptied onto associated communication channels or links on a first-in, first-out basis, and thereby forwarded to other nodal exchange facilities of the network.

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Queueing Technique for Bandwidth Allocation in a Packet Switched Network

In packet switched networks data messages are routed through multiple store and forward exchange nodes in multibit packet units. Typically, each nodal exchange determines the forward routing of packets by utilizing a stored route selection table to assign a storage queue to each packet on arrival. Such queues are emptied onto associated communication channels or links on a first- in, first-out basis, and thereby forwarded to other nodal exchange facilities of the network.

Priority messages such as network control information may be handled in the same queues, with priority indications enabling the exchange facility to forward priority messages before nonpriority messages.

A connumication channel between two nodes of the network may have a on rated bandwidth capacity in packets per second. This may be allocated on, a first-come, first-served basis to packets of common priority designation, and on a priority schedule to packets of different priority classifications. However, for certain classes of data (for instance, priority messages and realtime process control data) it is useful to be able to guarantee a portion of available bandwidth, so as to insure timely transmission regardless of the network traffic load.

A technique for accomplishing this is suggested in the accompanying illustration. A plurality of storage queues S1-S4 may be associated with each Link (or channel) L of a node. The queues may be emptied for forward transmission at different rates. As shown in the illustr...