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Bandwidth Reservation Strategy for Packet Switched Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084432D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friedman, SW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin Vol. 18, No. 6, November 1975, pages 1785 and 1786, and 1787 and 1788, describes techniques for throttling or preventing critical congestion in packet switched data communication networks, and for providing guaranteed bandwidth to network users on a message or session basis. The present description deals with a network strategy for selective reservation of bandwidth and buffering capacity for selected messages, by which congestion may be alleviated.

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Bandwidth Reservation Strategy for Packet Switched Networks

IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin Vol. 18, No. 6, November 1975, pages 1785 and 1786, and 1787 and 1788, describes techniques for throttling or preventing critical congestion in packet switched data communication networks, and for providing guaranteed bandwidth to network users on a message or session basis. The present description deals with a network strategy for selective reservation of bandwidth and buffering capacity for selected messages, by which congestion may be alleviated.

Bandwidth and buffer capacity are treated as preallocatable resources which can be reserved for selected messages or sessions. The present strategy is to organize the nodal packet-exchange facilities of the network so that certain messages or users may be assigned the equivalent of circuit connections for routing, whereas other packets will normally be forwarded to paths selected on the basis of instantaneous availability and delay. Packets transferred over reserved paths can be allocated a guaranteed bandwidth (in packets per second), in accordance with the principles set forth on the above-mentioned pages 1787 and 1788.

The information needed to allow an origin node to reserve and fix a "best" or shortest delay path for a message (or communications session) requiring such reservation comprises:
1. Timely measures of buffer utilization at neighboring

nodes.
2. Timely measures of channel or link utilization.
3. Information co...