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Plating of Diamond Metal Composite Coatings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084438D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cullen, FM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This method produces electroplated diamond-metal composite coatings of high-diamond density, while at the same time overcoming the tendency of the diamond particles to agglomerate into clusters which weaken the coating. Specifically, the method involves the use of diamond particles which have suitable surface properties in combination with a suitable additive agent, so that the electrical forces which tend to cause agglomeration in the plating solution are overcome.

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Plating of Diamond Metal Composite Coatings

This method produces electroplated diamond-metal composite coatings of high-diamond density, while at the same time overcoming the tendency of the diamond particles to agglomerate into clusters which weaken the coating. Specifically, the method involves the use of diamond particles which have suitable surface properties in combination with a suitable additive agent, so that the electrical forces which tend to cause agglomeration in the plating solution are overcome.

It has been found that wetting agents are not effective in preventing agglomeration of the commonly used natural diamond powder, which can be an especially serious problem with particle sizes smaller than 15 microns. However, synthetic diamond is effectively dispersed by a wetting agent. The different behavior of synthetic diamond is believed to be due to its different surface properties, resulting from the presence of the metallic catalyst used in the diamond manufacturing process.

Diamond density is an important parameter in diamond-metal composite wear-resistant coatings. It is desirable to have the diamond density as high as possible in order to minimize erosion of the matrix metal. If, however, the diamond density is too high, not enough space remains for sufficient matrix metal to form a strong bond to the substrate metal. Thus a tendency for the diamond particles to agglomerate into clusters during plating is very detrimental to the coating wear resis...