Browse Prior Art Database

Hospital Communications System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084521D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 6 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dickerson, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This data processing system is intended to reduce the amount of time presently devoted to record keeping in a hospital. Tasks such as manual input of doctor/patient data, review of patient profiles with possible corrections and additions, the labeling of prescriptions, etc., utilize considerable amounts of staff time in a hospital.

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Hospital Communications System

This data processing system is intended to reduce the amount of time presently devoted to record keeping in a hospital. Tasks such as manual input of doctor/patient data, review of patient profiles with possible corrections and additions, the labeling of prescriptions, etc., utilize considerable amounts of staff time in a hospital.

A hand-held input/output terminal, as described below, permits the hospital staff to efficiently utilize its existing manpower and to reduce the amount of time required in these tasks. In conjunction with the hand-held terminal, necessary support devices are placed in the nurses, station, the hospital pharmacy, laboratory, kitchen, X-ray department, accounting department, and other departments as desired. Fig. 1 shows an overview of the system.

In Fig. 1, a light weight portable terminal 1 provides two-way radio communication between any point within the hospital building and a remote point that is linked to the central processor (CPU) 2. The central processor 2 is also linked to a variety of other departments by direct line, such as the accounting department, permanent records, kitchen, pharmacy, X-ray, and nurses' station. Two-way communication between each of these units and the central processor is provided.

The terminal 1 has two modes of operation, the transmit mode and the receive mode. In the transmit mode, data would normally be entered through a keyboard 3 as shown in Fig. 2. The keyboard illustrated is a 27-position keyboard, but fewer or more keys could be utilized as desired. Many of the keys on the keyboard 3 would be of the function type in which the specific function called for by each key will be discussed later. Verbal communication capability is also provided through a microphone input 4. Visual messages are displayed in display 5 which might be, for example, a 32-character alphanumeric display. The display of messages might be made during the transmit mode, in order to verify the entries made for transmission and during the receive mode to verify the proper receipt of the message intended.

The function keys, when depressed, each perform a single function. Each key on the keyboard 3 has been given a descriptive label indicative of its function and there are ten digits for the numeric portion of the keyboard. Instructions may be given either by depressing a function key 6 alone or by depressing a function key 6 in combination with one of the numeric keys 7. It will be appreciated that by combining the ten digits of the numeric keys 7, a keyboard 3 could have a large number of instructions issued since the repertoire of available prescriptions and instructions for patient treatment could be considered as unlimited.

The user identification key 8 is depressed and might be connected so that the device 1 would be automatically turned on and the time and date displayed. The time and date would be provided from the central control unit 2. Each authorized member...