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Cable Connectors for Circuit Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084524D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aug, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Cards for holding integrated circuits and similar components frequently require connections to cables having large numbers of individual conductors. At the same time, the space available for such connections is usually relatively small. Figs. 1 and 2 show how the density of external connections can be increased.

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Cable Connectors for Circuit Cards

Cards for holding integrated circuits and similar components frequently require connections to cables having large numbers of individual conductors. At the same time, the space available for such connections is usually relatively small. Figs. 1 and 2 show how the density of external connections can be increased.

In Fig. 1, a conventional integrated-circuit socket 10 is mounted on a printed or wrapped-circuit card 11. A ceramic or other flat substrate 12 has pins 13 projecting therethrough for mating with corresponding connectors 14 in socket
10. Substrate 12 fits into housing 15, and is held by retainer 16 and screws or rivets 17. Flat multiconductor cable 18 is soldered or welded to land patterns 19. Some of the lands 19 may be connected directly to the pins 13.

In some applications, however, one or more semiconductor chips 20 may be connected between the cable conductors and the pins 13. Such chips may contain integrated circuits for, e.g., changing the levels of the cable signals to those used by components on card 11, or vice versa. Since such circuits must be placed on card 11 in any case, their integration into a cable connector effectively increases the number of circuits which can be placed on the card.

Fig. 2 shows another way of increasing effective circuit density. Many applications require cables which may connect to a large number of separate circuit cards. In Fig. 2, two flat multiconductor cables 18 and 18' are so...