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Acoustically Read Pulsed Image Converter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084527D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carleton, HR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Apparatus is shown for converting an optical image to a video pulse train. The apparatus comprises a thin piezoelectric layer 10 and a layer of optically sensitive material 12. A pair of electrodes, 14, 16 is provided so that a suitable electrical impulse can be impressed across the two material layers. One of the electrodes 16 is transparent so that an optical image can be impressed on the apparatus. A suitable output device 18 is provided at the end of the piezoelectric layer 10, which converts the acoustic energy to electrical signals for use as a video signal.

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Acoustically Read Pulsed Image Converter

Apparatus is shown for converting an optical image to a video pulse train. The apparatus comprises a thin piezoelectric layer 10 and a layer of optically sensitive material 12. A pair of electrodes, 14, 16 is provided so that a suitable electrical impulse can be impressed across the two material layers. One of the electrodes 16 is transparent so that an optical image can be impressed on the apparatus. A suitable output device 18 is provided at the end of the piezoelectric layer 10, which converts the acoustic energy to electrical signals for use as a video signal.

When an optical image is impressed on the apparatus, the optically sensitive layer 12 functions to provide a voltage division of the impressed impulse across the piezoelectric layer 10. Since this voltage will vary from point-to-point in the layer 12 due to the varying image intensity, the amplitude of each acoustic wave emanating from an image point will vary in direct proportion to the image intensity at that point.

The characteristic of the thin piezoelectric layer 10 to propagate sound is then used to provide a serial pulse train, which has a one-to-one correspondence with the image. Since the interrogating pulse was applied to all image points at the same instant, a pulse train will arrive at the output electrode 18 in which the sequence will be in one-to-one correspondence with the spatial order of the image points, and the amplitude of each point will corr...