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Material for a Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084552D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The possibility of using a "honeycomb" type of first wall for a controlled thermonuclear reactor is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 6, November 1975, pages 2032 and 2033. The primary problem of the first wall is the sputtering of it by ions which leak out of the confined plasma.

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Material for a Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor

The possibility of using a "honeycomb" type of first wall for a controlled thermonuclear reactor is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 6, November 1975, pages 2032 and 2033. The primary problem of the first wall is the sputtering of it by ions which leak out of the confined plasma.

The sputtered ions of the first wall cause two primary deleterious effects: their mass decreases the plasma pressure substantially, because they are so much heavier than the H and He of the plasma; and they can act as nuclei to allow line radiation which can escape the plasma and decrease plasma energy.

Any line radiation from H or He can be easily absorbed by the plasma-free electrons. However, line radiation from electrons falling into a heavy nucleus has a much lower cross section for absorption and will tend to escape the plasma and carry away energy. The relative importance of these two is different depending on the type of controlled thermonuclear reactor design.

It has been calculated heretofore that a macroscopic honeycomb structure first wall would reduce sputtering by about 70%, because most of the particles sputtered from the bottom of the honeycomb will hit its side walls and will not be injected into the plasma itself.

A dendrite material is proposed as a honeycomb structure. Dendrite tungsten material and an application for photon absorption is described in Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 26, No....