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Ferrite Magnetic Head Fabrication Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084579D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parker, JE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Magnetic ferrite elements used to form a transducing gap are often bonded with molten glass. In one such glassing technique shims are provided on one mating surface of a first piece of ferrite and a second ferrite part is positioned adjacent the first, but separated by the shims. A glass rod is then located adjacent the gap formed between the two pieces of ferrite, the entire assembly is subjected to heat sufficient to melt the glass, and the glass allowed to flow into the gap by capillary action.

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Ferrite Magnetic Head Fabrication Technique

Magnetic ferrite elements used to form a transducing gap are often bonded with molten glass. In one such glassing technique shims are provided on one mating surface of a first piece of ferrite and a second ferrite part is positioned adjacent the first, but separated by the shims. A glass rod is then located adjacent the gap formed between the two pieces of ferrite, the entire assembly is subjected to heat sufficient to melt the glass, and the glass allowed to flow into the gap by capillary action.

It has been noted that this small amount of glass flow is sufficient to dissolve or erode the ferrite, especially along the inner faces of the gap. Unfortunately, where a high-precision gap is required this small amount of erosion is sufficient to deteriorate the read or write capability of the resulting head.

Dissolution of the ferrite in the gap is avoided by coating the gap surfaces of the ferrite with an erosion resistant nonmagnetic material. Suitable materials include vacuum or sputter deposited silicon monoxide, silicon dioxide, and aluminum oxide. In addition to preventing ferrite erosion, these deposited nonmagnetic materials can also be utilized to provide shims or add to the thickness of preexisting shims.

Adding to the thickness of preexisting shims is especially useful where the same basic ferrite parts are utilized to build more than one head, the heads differing from one another only by width of the transducing...