Browse Prior Art Database

Function Binding in a Switching System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084639D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deaton, GA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The inherent connectivity and connectivity control mechanisms of a computer controlled switching system can be utilized to perform binding among hardware and software functions in a unified manner.

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Function Binding in a Switching System

The inherent connectivity and connectivity control mechanisms of a computer controlled switching system can be utilized to perform binding among hardware and software functions in a unified manner.

Line switching systems are able to establish a "connection" between two or more terminals for the duration of a session, as established and terminated by a controller which identifies the terminals by their addresses, real or derivative. The connection may be continuous, as in the case of a space division switched telephone system, such as described in the IBM Journal of Research and Development, Vol. 13, No. 4, July 1969, pages 408-455, or it may be of a time division nature such as shown in U. S. Patent 3,796,835. In the case of the cited
U. S. patent, the information may be transmitted synchronously in dedicated time division slots, or it may be transmitted asynchronously in a submultiplex channel comprised of certain header slots.

In all of these cases, there exists a situation whereby two addressable units are associated by the switching units in terms of their addresses, and communication can be conducted between such units essentially on a demand basis. Where the information is in digital form at the time it is switched, such as in the cited U.S. patent, there is no essential difference between voice and data, and it is of no concern to the switching system per se whether the terminals are voice terminals, such as telephones, or data devices, such as I/O devices, storage devices or processors.

Accordingly, it is possible to view such terminal systems in a unified fashion as function/device (F/D) elements of a switching system, which may be software functions or hardware devices, and which they are is of no concern to the switch per se. However, the identity of the F/D elements can be known to the controlling processor, such identity being recorded in the processor in tables corresponding to the terminal addresses.

Moreover, in the case of software function elements, the F/D elements are actually transportable from one physical location to another in the system by a mere operation of reading the software in terms of data from the first element into storage at the second element, the tables of the controller being suitably updated to follow the progress of the software as it thus migrates through the system.

This arrangement allows very flexible progessing within the system. Data can be transmitted to software functions for processing or vice versa, and overload conditions in software processing at one portion of the system can be relieved by replicating that software at ano...