Browse Prior Art Database

Functional Memory Holding Data Base Like Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084659D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Foster, GH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A logic function F performs a transformation of an address AD to an address AD', thereby permitting the use of the same address to address more than one memory without conflict at the output of the memory. Address AD' is a transformation of address AD in accordance with the following formula: AD' = AD x C + S = F(AD).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Functional Memory Holding Data Base Like Structures

A logic function F performs a transformation of an address AD to an address AD', thereby permitting the use of the same address to address more than one memory without conflict at the output of the memory. Address AD' is a transformation of address AD in accordance with the following formula: AD' = AD x C + S = F(AD).

AD' is an address as known today, it has an address domain starting at zero, and includes all integers, up to a maximum value (MAX). If F(AD) is an integer in the range zero to MAX, then data are transferred to (or from) the store. If F(AD) is not an integer in the range zero to MAX, then NF becomes active. NF (not found) can, at this point, be considered to be an `addressing exception' signal.

An example of using this form of addressing may be in an airline reservation system. AD is the date, the DATA is the record for a given date (say one flight). If L is the length of the record in bytes, and the flight flies daily, then: C = L over 7' S == date of first flight. (It is assumed, that S and C are stored in registers, or else can be modified easily.)

Fig. 2 shows a system where one "address' may be valid in several physical storage locations. AD is the address, F1, F2, F3 ... are function `boxes' addressing either separate storage systems (assumed, but not necessarily of the same type). The output of two or more function boxes may address a single store. It is assumed that if multiple function boxes address one store, the addressing ranges of the output of no two function boxes overlap.

If an addr...