Browse Prior Art Database

Ball and Belt Loop Braille Line Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084693D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nassimbene, EG: AUTHOR

Abstract

With this display 10, a relatively long character line of Braille cells represented by holes 12 is passed under the reader's fingers on an endless belt 14.

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Ball and Belt Loop Braille Line Display

With this display 10, a relatively long character line of Braille cells represented by holes 12 is passed under the reader's fingers on an endless belt
14.

The bosses of the Braille characters are small steel ball bearings 16 that are captured by the holes 12 in the belt 14, and held down by a magnetic backplate
18. A speed control 19 on the motor 20 and gear assembly 22 of the device 10 allows the reader to adjust the speed of the belt 14. A data selector unit and a computer are used to control the presentation of characters by the display 10.

The steel balls 16' are picked up by electromagnets 24,26,28. The electromagnets pick the balls 16' up and lift them partly through the moving belt
14. As the belt 14 moves along, it pulls the selected balls 16 along and away from the electromagnets 24,26,28. The balls 16 are attracted to and held from falling out by the magnetic-rubber backplate 18. When the balls 16 reach the end, they fall into a reservoir on the underside and are transported back toward the loading electromagnets by the return motion of the belt 14.

The reader can set up one full line of Braille and stop the belt movement to read the characters displayed. Alternately, with the belt 14 moving continuously, the reader can read the characters at any given point along the line. In this latter case, the rest of the characters along the length of the belt are ignored and the characters read as if they were presented by...