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Browse Prior Art Database

Braille Display with Omnipresent Character

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084694D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nassimbene, EG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This Braille display arrangement provides the equivalent to a full-line display with the driving mechanism required for a single character.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

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Braille Display with Omnipresent Character

This Braille display arrangement provides the equivalent to a full-line display with the driving mechanism required for a single character.

This display is based upon the observation that Braille is "read" one character cell at a time if there is sufficient separation between cells. Therefore, only the character being felt by the finger at a given instant is important...what the other characters are along the line at that time is immaterial.

The basic concept is to place "touch" sensors along the line where the user places his finger and to have the character associated with that position displayed at every character position on the line.

As he moves his finger along the line, new characters are being displayed in every position, but to the user it feels like wide-spaced Braille since the next character is being set up just before his finger gets to it. From a cost-hardware standpoint, the number of solenoid drivers required for a line of 40 characters has been reduced from 240 to only 6.

The display 10 comprises a base member 12 having a line of (40 for example) Braille character positions, at which a given character is to be displayed in the usual form of Braille bosses or dots.

Before each character is a touch sensing pad (40 total) which is encountered by the finger as it moves along the line. In its simplest implementation, these comprise 40 simple microswitches. In production, for cost considerations, touch sensor contact switches or capacitive flap membrane switches are preferred. As the finger passes over a pad, the next character is set up in all positions.

A pneumatic approach is good because the mechanism can be molded entirely of plastic in a single piece (Fig. 1). The body section 12 is molded plastic and the top 14 is a diaphragm...