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Substrate Heating Technique for Producing Local, Controlled, Uniform High Temperature, using Low Power Density

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084735D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baglin, JE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A heater which is attached to a substrate is described which is useful in the analysis of diffusion processes; and which is useful in the processing of ion implanted circuits, where other circuits are already present on the wafer which might be damaged by the annealing temperatures. This substrate heater produces local, controlled and uniform temperatures up to approx. 1000 degrees C, in vacuum or gas, leaves the heated substrate surface accessible over a relatively large area and operates with low-power density.

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Substrate Heating Technique for Producing Local, Controlled, Uniform High Temperature, using Low Power Density

A heater which is attached to a substrate is described which is useful in the analysis of diffusion processes; and which is useful in the processing of ion implanted circuits, where other circuits are already present on the wafer which might be damaged by the annealing temperatures. This substrate heater produces local, controlled and uniform temperatures up to approx. 1000 degrees C, in vacuum or gas, leaves the heated substrate surface accessible over a relatively large area and operates with low-power density.

Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate: a low-power platinum thin-film heater (e.g., on 1''x3''x1mm SiO(2) with approx. 1.5 ohms at room temperature); and a platinum resistance thermometer (e.g., approx. 100 ohms at room temperature) and is connected to a 4 Amp 20 Volt heater power supply.

SiO(2) is used in the semiconductor industry as a nonreactive substrate for semiconductor devices. Plating metallurgy adheres well to SiO(2) and is very chemically stable to about 1000 degrees C. Pt is used for high-precision resistance thermometers, typically of 100 ohms at room temperature, in conjunction with commercial temperature controllers.

In an exemplary unit of the dimensions shown, the Pt surface temperature is uniform within +/-10 degrees C at 1000 degrees C, up to approx. 1mm from the edges of the substrate, giving an exceptionally large (3/4 inch x 1-1/2 inch) and uniform heated region. The power required is relatively low (approx. 6 watts/ cm/2/). The temperature of the uncoated SiO(2) surface will be less than that of the Pt by about 20 degrees C at 1000 degrees C, and the difference w...