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Cycle for Lamination to Improve Product Stability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084787D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Doran, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During the manufacture of printed-circuit boards, material is laminated utilizing a cycle which involves loading the product, increasing the pressure and temperature to specified levels, holding the pressure and temperature at the specified levels for a given time and then cooling the material.

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Cycle for Lamination to Improve Product Stability

During the manufacture of printed-circuit boards, material is laminated utilizing a cycle which involves loading the product, increasing the pressure and temperature to specified levels, holding the pressure and temperature at the specified levels for a given time and then cooling the material.

The cooling is normally accomplished by terminating the steam supply which is used to heat the material and by running cooling water into the laminating press at a prespecified rate, so that the cooling occurs according to a prespecified curve. When the temperature gets into the neighborhood of ambient temperature, the circulation of water is stopped, pressure is released and the parts are removed from the press.

It has been found that improved product stability can be obtained by eliminating the cooling portion of the cycle and by allowing the parts to cool by convection after they are removed from the press. This convection cooling requires in the neighborhood of eight to nine hours. In accordance with this procedure, which can be termed a continuous temperature laminating cycle, only the pressure in the press is cycled. The temperature of the press is left at the operating temperature. The steam supply to the press can be shut off during load and unload periods in order to conserve steam.

The slow cooling cycle significantly enhances the stability of the resulting product.

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