Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Controlled Robot with Ultrasonic Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084899D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Affinito, FJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The addition of a narrow beam ultrasonic proximity sensor to the final movable element of a mechanical manipulator provides more definitive range and azimuth inputs along with noncontact sensing, to provide improved control over the movements of the manipulator so that it can be operated in a closed-loop mode as a shape detector.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Computer Controlled Robot with Ultrasonic Sensor

The addition of a narrow beam ultrasonic proximity sensor to the final movable element of a mechanical manipulator provides more definitive range and azimuth inputs along with noncontact sensing, to provide improved control over the movements of the manipulator so that it can be operated in a closed- loop mode as a shape detector.

The overall system configuration is shown in Fig. 1 where the ultrasonic detector, mounted on and movable with the final element of the manipulator, provides distance (in binary form) and amplitude (in analog form) information to the computer. The manipulator also delivers signals to the computer which measure the linear displacements X, Y, Z and the angular attitudes Theta(x), Theta(y), and Theta(z) of the final element of the manipulator to which the sensor is attached, and to which would be attached any tools or grippers necessary to operate upon the workpiece. The computer, and attendant controls, returns control signals to the manipulator to energize the six motors to effect changes in the linear and angular displacements.

The ultrasonic sensor shown in Fig. 2 consists essentially of a transmitter and receiver and a digital counter, to count the time of flight between the transmission of the sound pulse and receipt of the echo pulse. Because of the very narrow beams of the transducers (about 7 degrees) the beam can distinguish quite small discontinuities in the sensed object to provi...