Browse Prior Art Database

Personal Identification System using Signature Stylus Dynamics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084911D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Evangelisti, CJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The described personal identification system utilizes a person's signature for verification of identification, and more particularly utilizes information combining both the actual signature image and the stvlus dynamics used in the signing process.

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Personal Identification System using Signature Stylus Dynamics

The described personal identification system utilizes a person's signature for verification of identification, and more particularly utilizes information combining both the actual signature image and the stvlus dynamics used in the signing process.

Although signature verification is one of the more widely used forms of personal identification, it has inherent limitations due to the abilities of talented forgers to very closely reproduce, in appearance at least, any given person's signature to the point where detection of the forgery becomes almost impossible.

The present system utilizes conventional information, i.e., the signature image itself, and simultaneously captures and utilizes information involving the stylus dynamics, i.e., the motion of the writing instrument during the signing process. The concurrent inspection of both the image and the dynamic pattern provide very good verification results.

The system utilizes a device which shall be called a "signagraph" to produce information combining the signature image and the stylus dynamics used in the signing process. In one possible form the instrument itself comprises a small portable device no larger than a paperback book with the signing area being as small as one-inch wide and five inches long. The signing area has a stationary surface which could be composed of a plastic material, either clear or opaque, ordinary paper inserted or roll feed, or possibly an inserted document such as a bank check, sales slip, credit card voucher, etc.

Beneath this stationary surface are sensors for detecting the positional or areal location of the writing stylus by pressure such as by carbon paper, transfer paper or impact paper. Other nonphysical means such as electrical, magnetic, optical etc. could be used in making a separate recording of the detected motion. Depending on the application, the detecting or recording may be on a media that is part of the device. It may provide a permanent or temporary recording.

The user signs his name normally on the top...