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Magnetic Method of Inking Print Wires

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084949D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Darwin, DP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As shown in Fig. 1, ferrofluidic ink is contained in a pair of disposable sealed capsules 10. The capsules 10 are mounted to the print head by piercing bayonet type fittings 11 through the capsule ends. The ink is a colloidial suspension of 0.01 micron ferrite particles in a suitable carrier fluid.

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Magnetic Method of Inking Print Wires

As shown in Fig. 1, ferrofluidic ink is contained in a pair of disposable sealed capsules 10. The capsules 10 are mounted to the print head by piercing bayonet type fittings 11 through the capsule ends. The ink is a colloidial suspension of
0.01 micron ferrite particles in a suitable carrier fluid.

As seen in Figs. 2 and 3, permanent magnet or electromagnet 12 surrounds the print head such that a narrow air gap 14 is at the exit of the print wires. A passage 13 of small diameter connects this air gap 14 with the ink filled capsules
10. The ferrofluid is instantly drawn through passage 13 to the air gap 14 and across the print wire tips. The print wire tips are slightly recessed below the surface 16 of the print head.

During printing the print wires extend through the ferrofluidic ink to form a mark or dot on the original document being printed. As the wires are retracted after printing, the ink flows magnetically through the gap 14 recoating the wire tips. Thus in a continuous printing mode, the ink displaced by the print wires is constantly replaced from the reservoir 10 by the attraction of the ferrofluid to the concentrated magnetic gap 14 at the tip of the wires. Also, during nonprint time, the magnet 12 acts as a dam or seal to prevent the ink from flowing out of the reservoirs 10, similar to the ferromagnetic bearing seals.

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