Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Tape Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084968D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

George, OE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

From time-to-time new magnetic media recording and transport systems are developed. As each new system is provided it cannot be presumed that existing magnetic recording media will function in the system. Therefore, it is desirable to test magnetic recording media either in the new system, or in a robot simulation of the new system before committing the media for use with the system.

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Magnetic Tape Testing

From time-to-time new magnetic media recording and transport systems are developed. As each new system is provided it cannot be presumed that existing magnetic recording media will function in the system. Therefore, it is desirable to test magnetic recording media either in the new system, or in a robot simulation of the new system before committing the media for use with the system.

It has been determined that changes in temperature in magnetic recording media running in contact or near contact with a portion of a system, such as the transducing head, is indicative of the imminent wear or failure of the media within the system. This temperature relationship provides a basis for the following testing techniques.

The system shown is illustrative of one means of determining magnetic tape temperature in conjunction with a rotary magnetic head. In this test device, a length of anchored magnetic tape 2 is passed over a rotating head or a simulated rotating sample 4 and subjected to constant tension and pressure against the rotating sample by weight 6.

Media 2 consists generally of a magnetic composition coated on a flexible polymer substrate, the magnetic composition coating making direct contact with the rotating sample 4. The condition of the magnetic composition can be sensed through the polymeric substrate by a heat detecting device. In the apparatus illustrated an infrared microscope 8 is focused on the back of the tape 2 with the heat output data from the microscope fed directly to a chart recording device 10.

In operation, rotating sample 4 is rotated by a motor, not shown, at speeds simulating...