Browse Prior Art Database

Fabrication of Center Sections for a Write Wide Read Narrow Magnetic Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000084970D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Losee, PD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This process provides a simple method of fabricating a tapered center section for a magnetic head. The resulting center section shown at (d) is utilized to provide a write wide-read narrow head or a narrow read and/or write head coupled with a wide erase head. The materials utilized in this process are preferably magnetic ceramics, such as ferrite, and nonmagnetic ceramics, although other nonmagnetic materials such as glass or quartz may be utilized.

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Fabrication of Center Sections for a Write Wide Read Narrow Magnetic Head

This process provides a simple method of fabricating a tapered center section for a magnetic head. The resulting center section shown at (d) is utilized to provide a write wide-read narrow head or a narrow read and/or write head coupled with a wide erase head. The materials utilized in this process are preferably magnetic ceramics, such as ferrite, and nonmagnetic ceramics, although other nonmagnetic materials such as glass or quartz may be utilized.

Initially, as shown schematically at (a) magnetic block 1 and nonmagnetic block 2 are provided in three-dimensional rectilinear form, each having its adjacent surfaces machined or lapped smooth. Magnetic block 1 is joined to nonmagnetic block 2 by art known means such as adhesive or glassing. The method of bonding is a matter of choice. The resulting monolith is then modified, as shown at (b), by the removal of portions 3 and 4, shown in phantom, from blocks 2 and 1 respectively. If symmetry about an axis is unimportant, then the faces exposed in magnetic portion 1 and nonmagnetic portion 2 by these operations need not be parallel.

Subsequently, as shown at (c) a second nonmagnetic block 5 is bonded to the new angular surface of magnetic portion 1. Then, as shown at (c), in phantom, cuts 7, 8 and 9 are made in the sandwich.

Assuming the structure will be used in a head which is substantially rectilinear, cut 7 is made parallel to face 6 while cuts 8 and 9 are made parallel to one another and at right angles to faces...