Browse Prior Art Database

Short Circuit Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085094D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Skatrud, RO: AUTHOR

Abstract

The short-circuit detector described is particularly suitable for use in loop transmission systems. A portion of such a loop transmission system showing a single port and two adjacent ports is illustrated in Fig. 1. The port utilizes a standard Western Electric connector. When this port is not in use, a shorting plug is inserted in the connector to provide loop continuity. When it is in use, a plug connected to an associated terminal is connected at the port.

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Short Circuit Detector

The short-circuit detector described is particularly suitable for use in loop transmission systems. A portion of such a loop transmission system showing a single port and two adjacent ports is illustrated in Fig. 1. The port utilizes a standard Western Electric connector. When this port is not in use, a shorting plug is inserted in the connector to provide loop continuity. When it is in use, a plug connected to an associated terminal is connected at the port.

The tester illustrated in Fig. 2 is connected as indicated in the drawing to a plug and, when in use, will be inserted in the connector shown in Fig. 1. The connections to the plug are not illustrated in Fig. 2 in the interest of clarity. However, they are obvious from the legends used in the drawing.

The tester includes a seven-position rotary switch, a load resistor, a light- emitting diode (LED), and a 9-volt battery, all shown in Fig. 2. In addition, the necessary leads and a suitable plug for connecting to the transmit and receive wiring pairs illustrated in Fig. 1 will be required. The connections to the plug are as indicated by the legends in Fig. 2. This arrangement will test for all of the known combinations of shorts which could cause problems in the operations of a looped signaling system.

If it is desired to test an entire loop for shorts using the equipment described and illustrated, the loop must be broken at some point. This may preferably be done at the central or control station on the loop. The remaining ports on the loop must be short-circuited.

This can be done in one of two ways. The connected terminals may be disconnected and shorting plugs inserted in place thereof, or in many instances terminals are provided with shorting connections internally when power is turned off. Thus, turning power off in this instance at all terminals will provide the through connection required for testing the two segments of the loop from a given point.

The tester is inserted in one of the ports and will test one side of the loop, namely the receive side, and the other side of the loop, the transmit side. Depending upon the results of these tests, the locat...