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Method for Metered Gas Evolution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085163D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Sealed gas panel devices must be filled with carefully controlled mixtures of pure rare gases to pressures of the order of 100 Micron. According to this method, gas discharge display panels are filled by inert gases evolved during the crystallization of rare earth-transition metal alloys. The gases are to be incorporated in the alloys during their fabrication by sputtering.

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Method for Metered Gas Evolution

Sealed gas panel devices must be filled with carefully controlled mixtures of pure rare gases to pressures of the order of 100 Micron. According to this method, gas discharge display panels are filled by inert gases evolved during the crystallization of rare earth-transition metal alloys. The gases are to be incorporated in the alloys during their fabrication by sputtering.

Amorphous alloys, in particular, rare earth-transition metal alloys are prepared by bias sputtering. It is found that controlled amounts of rare gases are incorporated in the structure and the high concentrations (e.g., 10 to 25 atomic %) are a function of composition and system conditions. For example, Gd Co and Gd CoMo amorphous alloys have been sputtered with up to about 20 atomic % argon, and up to about 30 atomic % krypton.

These sizeable gas concentrations are condensed in the solid state and are stable from room temperature to the crystallization point. At this well-defined temperature, the gas is evolved in a burst, the amount of which is well defined, controlled and pure. The gas quantity can be the complete solid-state concentration, or a part thereof, dependent upon whether complete or partial crystallization is allowed.

The crystallization temperature varies according to the alloy concentration, for example, the Gd-Co binary alloys spontaneously crystallize at about 500 degrees C; the GdCoMo alloys with about 15 atomic % Mo crystallizes above 700 degrees C. If a mixture of two or more rare gases is required, then combinations of gases such as He-Ne, Ne-Ar, Ne-Kr, etc., can be incorporated into the amorphous alloy and upon crystallization produce the pure mixture of the gases.

Alternatively, the pure mixtures can be derived from individual films containing the appropriate gas.

The inert gases are released leaving behind any impurity gas. Therefore, the process acts as a purification technique, both in the formation through gettering and upon release. These rare earth alloys can also be used as gettering material for reactive gases, such as O(2), H(2)O, and N(2), by holding the rare gas bearing film at an elevated temperature for a time. For example, in filling a gas panel, a thin film of the rare earth-transition metal alloy containing the inert gas,
i.e., Gd-Co-Mo-Xe is deposited on a thin metal foil heating element, which is connected to an external source via a g...