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Preparation of Multilayer Modules Utilizing Glass Mixtures for Dielectric Insulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085185D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bakos, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The fabrication of a multilayer module incorporates two technologies: metallized ceramic and metallized glass. The lower structure of the module is a specially selected ceramic substrate and the upper layer structure consists of one or several layers of glass dielectric insulators. Between each layer via studs are placed for interconnection. The dielectric insulator is prepared by ball-milling the selected glass powder in a terpineol vehicle.

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Preparation of Multilayer Modules Utilizing Glass Mixtures for Dielectric Insulator

The fabrication of a multilayer module incorporates two technologies: metallized ceramic and metallized glass. The lower structure of the module is a specially selected ceramic substrate and the upper layer structure consists of one or several layers of glass dielectric insulators. Between each layer via studs are placed for interconnection. The dielectric insulator is prepared by ball-milling the selected glass powder in a terpineol vehicle.

Insulator application is achieved by spraying the glass slurry onto the substrate and baking the substrate at 125 degrees C to drive off the vehicle. The module is then sintered above 800 degrees C in a sequential gas ambient. After exposure, the module is cleaned, prebaked, and fine polished. The module is now ready for metal deposition. In this manner, each successive layer of glass/metal is built, one on top of the other, until the desired number of layers is reached.

During the glassing operation, bubble-type defects were found to occur in the part primarily associated with the glass/metal areas.

The defects caused subsequent processing problems and, in some instances, electrical failures. These defects have been designated as blowouts and sublayer bubbles. Blowouts are considered to be open-type bubbles and the sublayer bubbles as closed-type bubbles.

The process utilizes a 7070* type of glass insulator having a dielectric constant of 4.1 and a melting point of 820 degrees C. The problem with the process is that every time the newly deposited glass is exposed to its melting point, the already deposited glass layers will melt in the same manner...