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Debug Mechanism for Systems Using Asynchronous Interconnected Functions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085197D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Howe, LD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In today's large-scale integrated (LSI) environments, it is practical to construct systems as multiple function entities that communicate across complex interfaces. In these systems, the only reference point for these interfaces is the centralized system oscillator. As the speeds of circuits increase, the frequency of the oscillator also increases which makes this communication much more difficult. Also, as systems grow into many-way multiprocessors and the number of functional units and interfaces increase, it becomes an increasingly difficult problem to analyze design problems between functional units. The technique shown herein provides a means to analyze and define problems as they exist in these multifunction environments.

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Debug Mechanism for Systems Using Asynchronous Interconnected Functions

In today's large-scale integrated (LSI) environments, it is practical to construct systems as multiple function entities that communicate across complex interfaces. In these systems, the only reference point for these interfaces is the centralized system oscillator. As the speeds of circuits increase, the frequency of the oscillator also increases which makes this communication much more difficult. Also, as systems grow into many-way multiprocessors and the number of functional units and interfaces increase, it becomes an increasingly difficult problem to analyze design problems between functional units. The technique shown herein provides a means to analyze and define problems as they exist in these multifunction environments.

Each functional unit has its own clock and clock controls of the type shown in Fig. 1. It is relatively easy to control one clock for one function, but very difficult to control clocks across several functions. The technique shown here provides a method to single pulse a function, two functions, or a group of functions.

Single pulsing implies letting only one timing pulse out of the clock and then waiting for the next go command to let the next pulse out. Thus, to run a four- point timing cycle consisting of 0, 1, 2, and 3 times, it would take four go (start) commands.

Fig. 1 shows how single pulse between functions is possible. All clocks on each functional unit contain a circuit such...