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Programmable Voltage Monitoring System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085199D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Camau, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In electronic systems which utilize very dense large-scale integrated (LSI) circuits, it is desirable to closely monitor fluctuations in the power supply voltage. Outputs from the monitor can be used in conjunction with standard error detection circuitry for error analysis. External factors such as electrostatic discharge or abnormal current changes which introduce perturbations on the power distribution system can be separated from internal factors, such as timing skew or device degradation by use of the monitor. Since the power supply is usually located some distance from the LSI circuitry, monitoring directly at the output of the power supply is not sufficient because spurious signals can be introduced into the power distribution system between the monitoring point and the LSI logic circuitry.

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Programmable Voltage Monitoring System

In electronic systems which utilize very dense large-scale integrated (LSI) circuits, it is desirable to closely monitor fluctuations in the power supply voltage. Outputs from the monitor can be used in conjunction with standard error detection circuitry for error analysis. External factors such as electrostatic discharge or abnormal current changes which introduce perturbations on the power distribution system can be separated from internal factors, such as timing skew or device degradation by use of the monitor. Since the power supply is usually located some distance from the LSI circuitry, monitoring directly at the output of the power supply is not sufficient because spurious signals can be introduced into the power distribution system between the monitoring point and the LSI logic circuitry.

Improved detection performance can be obtained by mounting the monitoring circuitry with the actual logical circuitry. By integrating the monitoring circuitry in a LSI type technology and its associated control circuitry in a similar LSI logic technology, the mounting problem can be resolved. Thus, the monitoring system has a direct, high-speed hook into the logic or memory error detection mechanism and it responds to voltage variations in the same general area. This technique will simplify the hardware retry decision.

Fig. 1 shows a system which includes a main power complex 10 that provides power to logic circuitry located on card or board 12.

A voltage monitoring circuit 14 is located on the same card or board.

To monitor a two-level power complex, a total of four integrated voltage monitors would be required, one to detect overvoltage and one to detect undervoltage or each level. A separate...