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Improvement to Couplings for Pumping Optical Fiber

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085257D
Publication Date: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 150K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In several situations and commercial applications, it is desirable to pump optical fiber into long lengths of small diameter metal tubing. Often it is desirable to connect several individual, shorter lengths of tubing into one continuous length. This is often accomplished with the use of mechanical tubing connector such as those made by Swagelok. Sometimes, the fiber being pumped hangs up at the tubing connectors. Here we describe a simple modification to standard mechanical tubing connectors that should prevent the fiber from hanging up in the connector.

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Improvement to Couplings for Pumping Optical Fiber

In several situations and commercial applications, it is desirable to pump optical fiber into long lengths of small diameter metal tubing. Often it is desirable to connect several individual, shorter lengths of tubing into one continuous length. This is often accomplished with the use of mechanical tubing connector such as those made by Swagelok. Sometimes, the fiber being pumped hangs up at the tubing connectors. Here we describe a simple modification to standard mechanical tubing connectors that should prevent the fiber from hanging up in the connector.

Tubing

Connector Gap

Figure 1.

Figure 1 shows a standard mechanical tubing connector joining two lengths of tubing. Note that in the center of the connector there is a region where the inner diameter (ID) of the connector is larger than the ID of the tubing. This forms a gap or step where the fiber can hang during pumping operations. The hanging of the fiber at this step is illustrated in Figure 2.

Tubing

Connector Gap

End of Fiber May Hang Up in Gap

Fiber

Figure 2.

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To avoid any possibility of the fiber hanging in the connector, one may use a ferrule such as that shown in Figure 3. The ferrule outer diameter (OD) and ID closely match the ID of the connector and the ID of the tubing respectively. In addition, the length of the ferrule may be such that it practically fills the entire gap...