Browse Prior Art Database

Hole Badge Reader

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085314D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 5 page(s) / 121K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arndt, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Hole badge reader 20 shown in Fig. 1, uses 12 channels (10 for badge holes 22a-22j and 2 for transport position) of phototransistor light-emitting diode (PTX/LED) sensors for reading the data represented by punched holes 22a-22j in badge 22 inserted into reader 20. Advantageously, reader 20 utilizes no mechanical read sensors; badge 22 is not captured by reader 20 during the reading operation; and the read transport of reader 20 has few moving parts. Reader 20 supplies the following signals: 1. End-of-badge: 2. Emitter, one pulse for each of the 10 rows of openings 22a-22j of badge 22 as it travels through reader 20: and, 3. Data pulses for each of the data holes 22a-22j as badge 22 moves through reader 20. These signals are supplied to microcontroller 24 which executes the algorithm shown in Figs.

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Hole Badge Reader

Hole badge reader 20 shown in Fig. 1, uses 12 channels (10 for badge holes 22a-22j and 2 for transport position) of phototransistor light-emitting diode (PTX/LED) sensors for reading the data represented by punched holes 22a-22j in badge 22 inserted into reader 20. Advantageously, reader 20 utilizes no mechanical read sensors; badge 22 is not captured by reader 20 during the reading operation; and the read transport of reader 20 has few moving parts. Reader 20 supplies the following signals: 1. End-of-badge: 2. Emitter, one pulse for each of the 10 rows of openings 22a-22j of badge 22 as it travels through reader 20: and, 3. Data pulses for each of the data holes 22a-22j as badge 22 moves through reader 20. These signals are supplied to microcontroller 24 which executes the algorithm shown in Figs. 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D to read the badge data. The timing diagram of Fig. 3 show the relationship between the various signals.

Reader 20 includes an emitter 26 providing the emitter signals, and includes a PTX/LED array 28 for reading the data representative holes 22a. Both emitter 26 and array 28 provide these signals as badge 22 is inserted into reader 2O (in direction A). Array 28 is connected through digital compensating amplifier 30 to microcontroller 24. The end-of-badge signal is provided by an end-of-badge read head 32 that travels with carriage 34 that, in turn, travels with badge 22 as it is inserted into reader 20. Spring 36 is effective on carriage 34 for moving carriage 34 back to an initial position after badge 22 is withdrawn from reader 20 after reading has taken place.

The digital compensating amplifier 30 and the emitter 26 are described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin entries in Vol. 17, No. 12, May, 1975, pp. 3711-3713; and Vol. 17, No. 1, June, 1974, pp. 190 and 191; respectively.

Microcontroller 24 includes, as shown, a microprocessor having a control read-only store and a read/write buffer including counters and flags.

Reading of badge 22 is begun by inserting badge 22 into reader 20, moving badge 22 in direction A. Badge 22 is thus moved against carriage 34 and spring 36 acting on carriage 34, moving the punched openings 22a-22j in badge 22 beneath the PTX/LED array 28. In the particular type of badge 22 illustrated, there are 10 rows of openings 22a-22j, and there are 13 columns of the holes 22a-22j.

Referring to Fig. 2A, this initial movement of badge 22 into reader 20 causes the contents of the column buffer in microcontroller 24 to be made into blanks, as is shown in Step 1. The content of the row counter in microcontroller 24 is then brought to 10, as is shown in Step 2. A flag is reset at this time indicating that all of the PTX cells in array 28 have been seen as is indicated in Step 3.

A "reading a row" flag is then reset as is shown in Step 4. The microcontroller 24 then samples the read heads (PTX's) as is shown in Step 5.

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As is shown in Step 6, then a comparison is m...