Browse Prior Art Database

Conversational Monitoring System Extended Terminal Buffer Handler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085355D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Daniels, WE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The system set forth allows a conversational monitoring system (CMS) user to input up to 2000 characters of information from a terminal in a single input/output operation, by bypassing the normal 255-byte buffer which is a limitation of CMS.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Conversational Monitoring System Extended Terminal Buffer Handler

The system set forth allows a conversational monitoring system (CMS) user to input up to 2000 characters of information from a terminal in a single input/output operation, by bypassing the normal 255-byte buffer which is a limitation of CMS.

As an example of the practicality of this procedure, consider a device coupler acting as an interface between an experiment and a host system on which the user employs APLCMS.

Data being transmitted by the device coupler is presented to the host system as if the user were typing it at a terminal. Because of APLCMS input buffer size restrictions, it has been necessary for the experimenter to program the device coupler to issue a carriage return after a maximum of 128 characters of data has been transmitted. In an experiment which is running in `realtime', a delay would necessarily be incurred before the system reissued another start I/O to the terminal (hence the device coupler), thus causing the loss of important data points.

With no change of hardware in the present system, it is now possible to transmit almost 16 times the amount of data in a single I/O and in many cases this represents an entire experimental `run'.

As shown in the figure, the CMS extended terminal input is used as follows, where the numerals on the figure correspond to the identical numeric steps:
1. User requests extended terminal input by invoking an APL

function.
2. This APL function pass...