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Coating Parts to Prevent Sticking to Fixtures During Heat Treatment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085439D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Peter, AE: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the prior treatment of KOVAR* parts which were to be placed in straightening fixtures during a vacuum annealing heat treatment, the parts were first brushed or dusted with graphite particles to prevent adhesion of the K0VAR parts to the fixtures. However, it was often found that due to the granularity of the graphite particles, particles often became embedded in the KOVAR parts during the heat treatment and were very difficult or impossible to remove thereafter. This often resulted in the creation of pores, blisters and other defects in the parts during subsequent plating operations.

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Coating Parts to Prevent Sticking to Fixtures During Heat Treatment

In the prior treatment of KOVAR* parts which were to be placed in straightening fixtures during a vacuum annealing heat treatment, the parts were first brushed or dusted with graphite particles to prevent adhesion of the K0VAR parts to the fixtures. However, it was often found that due to the granularity of the graphite particles, particles often became embedded in the KOVAR parts during the heat treatment and were very difficult or impossible to remove thereafter. This often resulted in the creation of pores, blisters and other defects in the parts during subsequent plating operations.

This problem can be avoided by using an agitated suspension of Al(2)O(3) powder in FREON** to provide a similar separative layer on the KOVAR parts, rather than using the graphite material to prevent the adhesion of the parts to the fixtures. A suitable tank, surrounded by refrigeration coils to minimize the FREON evaporation, can contain up to 1 lb/gal of Al(2)O(3), which suspension is continually agitated by a mechanical stirrer.

The parts to be treated are dipped into the suspension and when they are withdrawn, the low-boiling point of the FREON allows the suspension to immediately dry and leave behind the residual dry powdered Al(2)O(3) coating which is relatively even, but thin, to protect the parts during the annealing heat treatment. * Trademark of Westinghouse Electric Corporation ** Trademark of
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