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Inorganic Sealing Glass for Fabricating Ink Jet Nozzle Arrays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085443D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Humenik, JN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The fabrication of glass containing structures such as ink jet nozzles, may require two sealing steps. In order to avoid the deformation of the glass nozzle on the first seal, and of the first seal glass on the second seal a thermal hierarchy must be established with respect to the annealing temperatures (T(A)) of the solder glasses used. This requires the second solder glass to have an extremely low sealing temperature, and yet have the necessary thermal expansion properties needed to fabricate a nozzle array at elevated temperatures. These properties cannot be met by a vitreous seal glass. Also, the viscosity of conventional crystallizing solder glasses is too high to achieve good seals.

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Inorganic Sealing Glass for Fabricating Ink Jet Nozzle Arrays

The fabrication of glass containing structures such as ink jet nozzles, may require two sealing steps. In order to avoid the deformation of the glass nozzle on the first seal, and of the first seal glass on the second seal a thermal hierarchy must be established with respect to the annealing temperatures (T(A)) of the solder glasses used. This requires the second solder glass to have an extremely low sealing temperature, and yet have the necessary thermal expansion properties needed to fabricate a nozzle array at elevated temperatures. These properties cannot be met by a vitreous seal glass. Also, the viscosity of conventional crystallizing solder glasses is too high to achieve good seals.

The difficulties are avoided by a seal glass which has a differential thermal analysis curve, as shown in Fig. 1. Upon heating to the sealing temperature, an endothermic peak representing the transition temperature (T(g)) of the glass, is the first peak to occur. The second peak, an exotherm represents the crystallization of the glass (CT(XL)). The final endothermic peak (T(L)) represents the liquidus temperature of the melting crystals. At this temperature the crystals have now melted and the material will flow to form a good seal. Provided the T(L) of the crystals is lower than the T(A) of the nozzle glass, no deformation of the nozzle will occur.

After the seal has been made, and the assembly is cooled, the solder glass will again crystallize. Once crystallization occurs on cooling, the material is no longer a glass and the concept of a T(A) for this mate...